Should You Be Worried About Leg Pain After a Car Accident?

leg pain after crash

After a crash, it can be hard to tell what are simple aches and pains, and what is a sign of something more serious. Leg pain is a common injury, but it can also be a sign of a serious injury that could require intensive care. So how do injured people tell the difference and decide what to do next?

In this blog, we’re going to focus specifically on leg pain after a car crash and how this pain might point toward a more serious injury. Understanding the source of your leg pain could be an important aspect of a potential personal injury case, as well as your physical and emotional health moving forward.

We do not make any medical decisions. Those decisions are between you and your doctor. We take what the doctors say about your injuries and provide you with legal advice.

Over our years of experience, we have seen many, many leg and foot injuries from car accidents. Below you will find information on what we see when representing clients with leg pain after a crash. To fully understand your injuries, you need to talk to a medical professional.

Common Leg Injury Symptoms After a Car Crash

If you’re experiencing pain, weakness, soreness, or other leg discomfort after a crash, it could be a sign that something is seriously wrong. That doesn’t mean you should worry, however, just that you should go see a doctor so  you understand what type of injury you could be experiencing.

Here are the most common leg injuries our firm sees for clients who have been in a car accident:

  • Bruises and Cuts: It’s rare for a car crash victim to not suffer at least minor bruises and lacerations, even from relatively minor accidents. Most of these injuries will heal within a few days, but more severe bruises and cuts could require stitches, medication, or even surgery.
  • Soft Tissue Injuries: Our clients have often suffered sprains, tears, and ruptures in their lower extremities after a car crash. Many of these injuries will heal over time with the help of rest, medication, and physical therapy. Others, however, require surgery and can cause life-long issues.
  • Knee Injuries: In addition to muscle and bone damage, knee injuries often include damage to the various ligaments and tissues that make up the knee joint:
    • Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). The ACL connects your femur with your tibia to stabilize your knee joint. When this ligament is damaged, it can be extremely painful and leave lasting effects. This injury often requires surgery.
    • Posterior collateral ligament (PCL). Severe PCL injuries are less common than ACL injuries but can be every bit as painful and damaging. Even though the PCL is located in the back of the knee, it can often be injured when a bent knee makes blunt force trauma with a dashboard or steering wheel.
    • Meniscus. The meniscus is a c-shaped piece of cartilage that acts as a cushion for the kneecap. If you tear your meniscus, you will be unable to bear weight on that knee and will require surgery in order to heal properly.
  • Broken Bones or Fractures: We all have dozens of fragile bones in our legs, feet, and toes, all of which are vulnerable in a car crash. Whether your pain is a result of a hairline fracture, a clean fracture, or a compound fracture, you will need to visit a medical professional. Minor breaks (such as in your toes) will often heal on their own, but when left undiagnosed, can become more serious. More severe fractures will need to be set and cast — and might even require pins, screws, rods, plates, or even full joint replacements.
  • Herniated Disks/Sciatica: The discs in your back rest between the bones of your spine to provide cushion and support. When the nucleus of one of these discs rips or bulges, it presses on the spine causing sciatica. Sciatica is a sharp shooting pain that consistently shoots down the sciatic nerve from your spine through your lower leg(s). It can be incredibly painful or even cause numbness, weakness, or pins and needles in the back of the leg.  

Every accident is different, and everyone’s body is different, so your pain will depend on your unique experience. If you’re experiencing some of these symptoms, or even something different it’s a sign that you’ve been injured.

What to Do If You Have Leg Pain Following a Car Accident

Leg pain following a car crash can be symptomatic of a very serious injury. We are not doctors and cannot provide you with medical advice. If you’re experiencing leg pain, don’t ignore it or sit around worrying about what it might be. It is in your best interest to go to the emergency room or urgent care, or to immediately or schedule an appointment with your primary care physician. The faster you get medical attention and receive a diagnosis, the faster you’ll be on the path to recovery.

In addition, you should document your symptoms and any financial costs or emotional turmoil you’re experiencing as a result of your leg pain. Gather and preserve documents like:

  • Police reports
  • Pain journal
  • Medical bills
  • Photos of the crash site or your injuries
  • Correspondence from insurance companies
  • All medical records, including x-rays, CT scan results, MRI data, etc.

Armed with this evidence, your personal injury attorney will be able to understand the circumstances of your situation, calculate your damages, and better represent you with the insurance company or in court.

RELATED: How Do Pain and Suffering Damages Work in Personal Injury Claims?

Contact Myers Law Firm for Help After a Car Crash

Filing an insurance claim or a lawsuit is a viable way for accident victims to recoup their medical care costs and pain and suffering. But, in order to understand the lifetime value of your claim and increase the chances of success, you need a skilled and experienced personal injury attorney at your side.

Providing honest, client-focused representation for more than 40 years, Myers Law Firm is dedicated to providing you with the legal resources you need to file and litigate a successful claim. Please call (888) 376-2889 today or complete this simple form to schedule your confidential free consultation with one of our personal injury lawyers.

The content provided here is for informational purposes only and should not be construed as legal advice on any subject.