Bicycle Accidents

According to the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration (NHTSA), 743 bicyclists were killed and an estimated 48,000 were injured in motor vehicle traffic crashes in 2013. Furthermore, 70% of all fatal bicycle crashes, the NHTSA reports, involve a head injury — making helmet use an imperative safety measure for all riders.

At Myers Law Firm, we are committed to advocating for the rights and safety of North Carolina cyclists. Besides providing an environmentally-friendly mode of practical transportation, biking offers an enjoyable way to stay fit and see the natural beauty and cultural attractions of our cities and towns. When cyclists adopt safe riding habits and motor vehicle drivers look out for bicycles and drive in a conscientious manner, everyone wins.

Biking becomes dangerous, though, when drivers refuse to pay attention and share the road. All too often, motor vehicle drivers injure cyclists by:

  • Failing to stop at stop lights
  • Driving too fast
  • Opening a car door in a rider’s path
  • Failing to notice bike riders until it’s too late to avoid a crash

If you’ve been injured in a bike accident in North Carolina that was not your fault, you may be entitled to compensation for your medical bills, your pain and suffering, wages lost as a result of the injury, damage to your bicycle, and more.

If your injuries caused long-term or permanent impairment, you may also be able to recover compensation for the cost of future care and treatments as well as the injury’s impact on your ability to earn a living.

Why You Need an Attorney

After a car crashes into your bike, you need to make a claim against the car driver’s insurance company for injuries and property damage. Unfortunately, you should not expect the insurance company to offer you any help. Instead, they will likely analyze every aspect of what happened, looking for evidence they can use to deny your claim.

North Carolina law follows the unfair doctrine of “contributory negligence,” which holds that if a person is even 1 percent responsible for causing his or her own injuries, that person is not eligible to recover compensation from others — even if the other party (or parties) acted in a negligent manner and played a much greater role in causing the incident and the resulting injuries.

Car insurance companies use this harsh rule to deny claims in bicycle crash cases, even when the rule shouldn’t apply. Because the “contributory negligence” doctrine creates an uphill battle for injury victims in North Carolina, you should let an experienced personal injury attorney handle your bike accident claim.

If you choose Myers Law Firm to represent you, we will use our attorneys’ years of experience handling personal injury cases to:

  • Evaluate the circumstances surrounding your claim during a free consultation
  • Give you an honest assessment of your legal options
  • Create a legal strategy that puts your needs before any other concern
  • Fight allegations from the insurance company if they claim you were at fault for your injuries

Contact Myers Law Firm If You’ve Been Injured

If you’ve been injured in a bicycle accident, Myers Law Firm can help. We offer free initial consultations for all personal injury cases. If you choose our firm to represent you, we’ll advocate for you with an aggressive and effective legal strategy that puts your needs before any other concern.

Remember that North Carolina has a three-year statute of limitations for personal injury cases, so waiting to contact us could take away your right to file a lawsuit and receive compensation.

To schedule your free consultation, please call our Charlotte office toll-free at 1-888-376-ATTY (2889) or fill out and submit our online contact form. We will follow up and get in touch with you as soon as possible.

References

National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. (2015, May). Bicyclists and other cyclists: 2013 data. (Traffic Safety Facts. Report No. DOT HS 812 151). Washington, DC: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Retrieved from http://www-nrd.nhtsa.dot.gov/Pubs/812151.pdf